Wellicide: An Alternative to a Painful, Miserable, Hopeless and Expensive Way of Dying

Introduction

Death doesn’t get a lot of attention in wellness circles, except as a warning. Premature death is portrayed as the ultimate risk factor for failing to live wisely, that is, in a manner consistent with wellness ways. (Needless to mention, I hope, is that postponing death is not even close to one of the better reasons for living wisely.)

Few wellness promoters have put a positive spin on death, to my knowledge. Until now. It must not be ignored, for the consequences of doing so can be rather dreadful. So, wellness promoters and everyone else-consider the possibilities of a REAL wellness way to die, when you’re good and ready-and when staying alive options in a decent-enough state are nil. There is, after all, a wellness option, if you plan for it and conditions are right.

Robert Green Ingersoll, at the beginning of his poignant January 9, 1882, Oration at a Child’s Grave, spoke these words:

Why should we fear that which will come to all that is? We cannot tell, we do not know, which is the greatest blessing – life or death. We cannot say that death is not a good.

That idea of death as a good has never caught on. Nobody wants to rush things, but extending life if and when it becomes unbearable or even gruesome with mortal agonies can’t be very appealing.

Now the time has come to expand the scope of REAL wellness to the final act of life, when you, in consultation with medical experts, conclude that no further jewels of joy can be picked up and treasured. Planning your own death is a key element in a new and improved concept of wellness. That is, REAL wellness.

Dying

Many if not most people die after a lingering illness, in a hospital, a hospice or at home after a period of decline and suffering, oftentimes in ways that are difficult, to say the least. The exception is dying unexpectedly from a heart attack or stroke, car or plane crash or other random fashion. For most in relatively peaceful societies, death is slow, gradual and unpleasant. In time, life becomes less and less attractive, joys diminish and miseries increase. Often pain grows worse as the body shuts down, little by little, inexorably, mercilessly.

When the prospects for a worthwhile quality of existence are judged gone forever, by you, a pain-free and peaceful end should be a REAL wellness choice, if desired.

Because of religions, however, this right does not exist, except in a few places on Earth (including all of Canada and six U.S. states and the District of Columbia.) This is largely because, as it does with almost everything else, religion poisons death.

The Heavy Hand of Religion on Dying in America

As with slavery, prohibition, stoning, arranged marriages, blasphemy prosecutions and Sunday blue laws forbidding commerce in general and enjoyment in particular on the Lord’s day, government-enforced strictures blocking right to die options are eroding. In time, bans against doctor-assisted or personally initiated suicide at one’s discretion will be considered benighted and grotesque, similar to the above noted examples of past church meddling in matters of individual choice. But, probably not in time, if you want this prerogative but don’t reside in Oregon, Montana, Colorado, Vermont, California, Washington, the District of Columbia or other U.S. jurisdictions that permit what seems a basic secular right.

Regrettably, those guided by interpretations of revelations, holy books and a variety of dogmas and creeds insist that everyone, believer or not, follow their faith-based beliefs. Only God gets to play god, say religionists like Trump’s gift to the Supreme Court, Neal Gorsuch. The newest justice even wrote a book against choice in dying, citing the Catholic mantra about the inviolability of human life.

Christians insist that their god alone gets to decide when Christians and everyone else are allowed to die. Alas, their god seems to have a nasty habit of allowing if not inflicting long periods of utter misery, torture actually, before getting around to deciding, OK, you can stop suffering now.

Arguments about death in dying, death with dignity, final exit/options are associated in America with church/state conflicts. Absent religions, there would be little or no opposition to choice for when and how to die.

Your Choice

People who have watched a loved one die know why choice in dying is important. To deny a peaceful end of one’s own timing seems a fundamental human right. But, it’s little wonder we’re a death-denying society, given religious fantasies. I live in the Tampa Bay area of Florida. In reading the daily obituaries in the Tampa Bay Times, one might think even those whose pictures appear in the obit pages did not really die. They passed, they went off to be with their Lord and Savior, or they relocated to heaven to live with a loved one lost years ago (who presumably turned up in this imaginary but better place).

For varied opinions on legalizing or forbidding choice in dying, you might find the June 3, 2017 Letters section of the New York Times instructive. The letters refer to a May 28 series entitled, The Death and Life of John Shields.

A healthy lifestyle includes, in addition to wise choices and actions in such areas as exercise and nutrition, managing stress, using reason, seeking exuberance and embracing personal freedoms, a strong sense of personal responsibility for all that affects your life. It seems logical that all who embrace this philosophy for living well will want to apply the same level of self accountability when death approaches, if circumstances allow.

Be well, enjoy life and accept that in time we all must die. In America, we should have the right to decide, if circumstances permit, how and when we end.

Trust the Swiss to Keep Your Money Safe

Zürich, Switzerland, ranks first, or a close second, in all the many quality of life surveys during recent years. This beautiful city by a lake is also the wealthiest city in Europe, home to many major financial institutions and banking giants.

What recommends Zürich to me always has been its people, personified by my longtime friend, Rob Vrijhof.

On my first visit years ago, I flew overnight from Miami to Zürich, nine hours nonstop. The six-hour time difference had my body clock telling my stomach “breakfast.”

But my genial host, Rob, insisted on the perfect cure: a bracing drive up into the Jungfrau, with lunch in a mountain chalet.

It was June, a sunny, comfortable 75 degrees by Lake Zürich, as we ascended the Alps in Rob’s top-down convertible. Speeding around precarious, twisting curves, the higher we went, the colder it got.

Who knew that daily temps are 50 degrees or lower up in those impressive Alps?

But even as I shivered, I experienced a curious, alarming, almost obscene feeling: My top half was freezing cold, but my bottom was getting toasty.

As a Miata owner, this was my unexpected introduction to the luxury of heated Mercedes car seats!

You too can discover comforting surprises in Switzerland. Ones that will warm your heart and heat up your investment returns – with the right guide at the wheel.

Your Money’s Welcome in Switzerland

Switzerland today still stands as the world’s best all-around offshore banking and asset protection haven despite the compromises the Swiss have been forced to make under international pressure.

Swiss financial privacy laws still are the world’s most protective, so long as you pay your home country’s taxes.

Many people would love to have a Swiss passport and enjoy the benefits of Switzerland’s unique, sovereign and politically neutral status. Sadly, it’s one of the most difficult to obtain.

You can visit and even stay a long time, but to become Swiss without being born there is next to impossible.

Many wealthy foreigners do make their homes in Switzerland. Over 3,500 of these take advantage of individual fiscal forfait tax deals offered by Swiss cantons (provinces), paying agreed upon annual taxes.

It’s become fashionable to say that American clients are unwelcome at Swiss banks. But that’s simply not true.

Your money is most welcome there, so long as you have enough to make managing it worthwhile… which is less than you may think.

The current estimate is that Swiss banks manage at least one-third of all assets held offshore by the world’s wealthy, an estimated $3 trillion to $4 trillion.

An Alternative to the Dollar

There is another good reason to consider Switzerland as a base for your investments: the mighty Swiss franc.

Traditionally, when world trouble flares, such as with tweets about North Korea threatening annihilation, financial anxiety mounts. Money managers then turn to that usually comforting currency refuge, the American dollar.

But the dollar hasn’t been doing too well in 2017.

The alternative is the Swiss franc, long a “safe haven” currency that smart investors buy when other currencies, including the euro and the dollar, are under pressure.

The franc is a world-respected currency backed by a robust national economy, a stable political framework and enough liquidity to deal with turmoil in international trading.